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07/06/2017

  • Broadcast Date:
    Thu, July 6, 2017
    There was a rare happening on the U.S. agricultural trade front this spring. (Gary Crawford and Bryce Cooke)
  • Broadcast Date:
    Thu, July 6, 2017
    Bryce Cooke, USDA trade economist, with U.S. agricultural trade numbers for the first eight months of this fiscal year.
  • Broadcast Date:
    Thu, July 6, 2017
    In several instances this past Spring was memorable in terms of little or no drought covering the continental US. (Rod Bain and USDA meteorologist, Brad Rippey)
  • Broadcast Date:
    Thu, July 6, 2017
    The drought impacting the Northern Plains is also covering much of the nation's spring wheat growing areas at this time. (Rod Bain and USDA meteorologist, Brad Rippey)
  • Broadcast Date:
    Thu, July 6, 2017
    Extreme drought conditions in parts of the Dakotas and Montana continue to grow, according to the latest US Drought Monitor. (Rod Bain and USDA meteorologist, Brad Rippey)
  • Broadcast Date:
    Thu, July 6, 2017
    USDA meteorologist, Brad Rippey, focuses primarily on the Northern Plains in the latest US Drought Monitor, although a small percent of the nation is also experiencing moderate drought at this time.
  • Broadcast Date:
    Thu, July 6, 2017
    Recent tremors in Yellowstone National Park, home of a volcanic caldera, had some wondering if a Wednesday quake originated from that area. (Rod Bain and USDA meteorologist, Brad Rippey)
  • Broadcast Date:
    Thu, July 6, 2017
    Heat stress for backyard chickens and other poultry can be avoided with a variety of strategies. (Rod Bain and Ashley Wright of University of Arizona Extension)
  • Broadcast Date:
    Thu, July 6, 2017
    Ashley Wright of University of Arizona Extension notes how to tell if a backyard chicken is in heat stress, and how to help to prevent potential heat stroke.
  • Broadcast Date:
    Thu, July 6, 2017
    Ashley Wright of University of Arizona Extension explains how chickens and backyard poultry cool themselves in the heat and humidity of summer, and why heat stress is a concern in extreme conditions.