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07/05/2017

  • Broadcast Date:
    Wed, July 5, 2017
    An ag economist offers a method to measure the economic effects of sanitary and phytosanitary trade barriers on US ag exports. (Rod Bain and Jason Grant of Virginia Tech University)
  • Broadcast Date:
    Wed, July 5, 2017
    Virginia Tech University ag economist, Jason Grant, explains the growth of non-tariff trade barriers from the creation of the World Trade Organization in 1995, and its impacts on agricultural trade.
  • Broadcast Date:
    Wed, July 5, 2017
    USDA's five year Census to measure US farming and ranching offers insights into the why's behind crop and industry trends. (Rod Bain and Lance Honig of the National Agricultural Statistics Service)
  • Broadcast Date:
    Wed, July 5, 2017
    Brad Rippey, USDA meteorologist, with the latest on the development and condition of the rice crop.
  • Broadcast Date:
    Wed, July 5, 2017
    Brad Rippey, USDA meteorologist, with the latest on the development and condition of the peanut crop.
  • Broadcast Date:
    Wed, July 5, 2017
    Winter wheat harvesting has passed the halfway mark, nationwide, which means this is the last USDA winter wheat condition report for the season. (Stephanie Ho and USDA meteorologist, Brad Rippey)
  • Broadcast Date:
    Wed, July 5, 2017
    Drought conditions in the northern plains are pushing spring wheat conditions down. (Stephanie Ho and USDA meteorologist, Brad Rippey)
  • Broadcast Date:
    Wed, July 5, 2017
    Corn conditions are not as good as last year, but still, "reasonably good." (Stephanie Ho and USDA meteorologist, Brad Rippey)
  • Broadcast Date:
    Wed, July 5, 2017
    Soy conditions are not as good as the same time last year, but blooming progress is ahead of the averages. (Stephanie Ho and USDA meteorologist, Brad Rippey)
  • Broadcast Date:
    Wed, July 5, 2017
    Hot dry weather in Texas is bad for cotton, which is bad for cotton conditions nationwide. (Stephanie Ho and USDA meteorologist, Brad Rippey)